Category Archives: Oxfordshire

Oxford Mommy’s new job

Are you a busy parent?

Don’t worry, I’m still Oxford Mommy and I’ll be reviewing Oxford’s eateries, attractions, and activities for baby- and toddler-friendliness for a long time to come! But I also have a new job as a Professional Declutterer and Organizer. I’ve opened my own business, Clear the Decks!

Never heard of that job before? Most people haven’t! A professional declutterer and organizer helps others transform their living and working spaces into something that truly fits their needs. I’ve always had a passion for organizing, and now I’m making it into my profession. I work with anyone who needs their home decluttered and organized, but as the parent of a young child I am very much in tune with the needs of families with young children.

If you need help paring down your stuff and organizing your home and your schedule so that you have more space and time for your family, I’m here to help. And because I am so grateful to my Oxford Mommy readers for supporting me over the last two and a half years, I’m offering a 15% discount to anyone who books a session with me before 31 December 2015. Email me at clearthedecksUK@gmail.com to book a consultation.

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Wildwood Kitchen, Wantage

We are often in Wantage to visit the Baberoo’s grandparents, so we like to go out and discover its activities and eateries. Fairly new to town is the 8th branch of the Wildwood Kitchen (43 Market Place, OX12 8AW), which has claimed a prime location in the town centre. On a recent trip to Wantage we thought we’d give it a try along with the Baberoo’s Gran and see how it rated for baby- and toddler-friendliness.

I was feeling virtuous so ordered three salads as a selection from the deli menu. All were delicious, with the grains cooked al dente and the greens very fresh. There were no dressings at all on them – which I appreciated since I rarely like dressings – but it would have been nice to have several slices of lemon available if I’d wished to season them.

Wildwood Kitchen salads

For the Baberoo I ordered the sausages, chips and peas from the kids’ menu (£4.75 for main and dessert, with 80p supplement for a drink). Although she didn’t eat much of the sausages, she wolfed down the chips (which always seem to take priority over everything else!).

Wildwood Kitchen kids' meal

Service was a bit choppy – we had at least five different staff members approach our table for various reasons, which made it seem like they weren’t coordinating with each other very well. It didn’t affect our enjoyment of the meal, but it did give the restaurant a greenhorn kind of feel which didn’t match with the swishness of the surroundings.

So, how did Wildwood Kitchen rate for baby- and toddler-friendliness? Here’s how it stacked up against my five criteria:

Menu: The menu at Wildwood includes many pastas and risottos, most of which can be eaten with one hand if you’re holding a baby in the other arm. The pizzas and meat dishes would be more difficult. If you’re looking for a salad, order from their deli menu – it’s got a rotating selection and the salads are all certainly possible to eat with only one hand free.

Space: This is one restaurant where you’ll never have trouble manoeuvring or parking your baby carriage, even if it’s enormous. There’s so much space between tables that you could still wheel your buggy through the aisles even if all the seats are taken. There are also several useful corners, cubbyholes, and niches in which to park your pushchair. When we visited, only about half the tables were full, but I counted seven parked strollers (including ours), all of which were ensconced safely without blocking or impeding anyone’s path through the restaurant. The only small niggle is that getting into the place requires opening a fairly heavy door and then pushing your carriage up a short incline.

Wildwood Kitchen space

Ambiance: Industrial decor tempered with wood and leather. The high ceilings and beautiful lighting really make this open space seem welcoming and the heavy wooden table of goodies/deli items at the front definitely draws the eye in from outside. Staff are generally friendly and some of the servers we encountered took the time to talk to the Baberoo. There’s also a colouring book with stickers for kids to amuse themselves with before the meal arrives.

Wildwood Kitchen kids' menu

Facilities: The baby-changing/disabled toilet is well located on the ground floor, and is spacious enough to fit a pushchair in with you. The pull-down table is the narrow variety. It doesn’t have windows and the lighting seems a bit dim, but the pretty wallpaper and cleanliness make it quite a pleasant bathroom to use for a diaper change.

Wildwood Kitchen baby-changing facilities

Feeding: If you’re breastfeeding, you have a choice of leather-upholstered booth seats, which are extremely well-padded (almost too well-padded! I had to move several pillows away so that I could actually sit comfortably) or fabric-covered chairs without arms. With the booth seats you don’t get much wiggle room before you’re right up against the table, so it might only work for smaller babes-in-arms. With the chairs you might have more comfort with an older breastfeeder. If your child needs a high chair, it looks like the restaurant has plenty in supply – there were at least 7 kids using them when we were there. The kids’ menu is good value at £4.75 for a main and dessert; the offerings are all the usual favourites. It’s 80p extra for a kids’ drink.

In total, Wildwood Kitchen gets a 7.75 out of 10 for baby- and toddler-friendliness. Let’s hope they can smooth out their service, and then it’ll be a great addition to Wantage’s places to go with kids.

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Nick Cope

The Baberoo has owned one of the CDs by Nick Cope, the Oxford-based children’s singer-songwriter, for quite a while now, and we have always enjoyed listening to his music. But we had never been to see one of his concerts (£3 per child, £1 per adult) until last month. We accompanied some friends who are regular attendees to a performance at the St Albans Church Hall in East Oxford (corner of Charles and Catherine Streets), and as soon as he started playing I kicked myself for not attending a live show before.

There’s a reason Nick Cope has such a strong following. He is beloved by both children and parents because his songs are delightful and catchy. We’ve all had the irritating ‘Wheels on the Bus’ earworm follow us around for days at a time, but Nick Cope’s songs are so funny and tuneful that it’s actually a pleasure to catch yourself humming, oh, say, a song about a witch that lived in a forest with a pet dragon named Keith.

It’s his unusual and inventive songwriting that’ll charm you first, and if you’ve got his CDs (he’s got three so far and a fourth to be released for Christmas 2014) then it’s fun to sing along to his indie-pop-sounding songs with your little one at home. But when you see him performing live, you’ll realize what you’ve been missing. It is brilliant live entertainment. He’s got an incredible talent for relating to both children and adults at the same time. He gets the audience clapping, stomping, making faces, and jumping up and down with gusto. His act is a perfect balance of over-the-top gurning and deadpan patter. And his impressions are spot-on; when he does one of his animal songs you actually believe that what you are seeing in front of you is a meerkat.

Nick Cope plays weekly family music sessions at several locations in Oxford and Abingdon, and also performs at festivals and events in and around Oxfordshire. The session we have attended most frequently runs from 10:45-11:45 on Fridays at St Albans Church Hall in East Oxford (although it’s a bit of a trek for us; I wish there was a concert location in Headington!). We’ve also been to see him in Wantage at the Beacon, and he’s a regular at the Story Museum during school holidays. Check Nick’s site for details of locations and times for upcoming sessions. The following details about space, ambiance, facilities, and feeding (as per my usual ratings system) refer specifically to the St Albans Church Hall location.

Space: The space at St Albans Church Hall isn’t huge, but it’s got enough room for about 30-40 families, including enough space for everyone’s baby carriage to be parked at the back. A half-circle of about 30 chairs provides a seating space, and there’s plenty more space to sit on the floor. Many children love to go right up to the front to watch Nick play, all the better to watch his hilarious facial expressions.

Ambiance: The feeling when you walk into a Nick Cope concert couldn’t be more wonderful. The music puts you in such a good mood that you feel like you’re friends with everyone in the room. To watch the gyrating toddlers throwing themselves around in gleeful abandon takes you back to your own childhood, lifting your spirits and temporarily banishing all your worries. There’s a reason I’ve never seen a kid cry at a Nick Cope concert (unless they’ve fallen and bonked themselves, in which case the crying only lasts a couple of seconds). It’s like magic. Yes, it’s that good.

Facilities: St Albans Church Hall, unfortunately, does not have any baby-changing facilities. However, there would be ample space on the floor (not in the bathroom itself, but in the concert area) if you needed to change a diaper. But I’m guessing most people who attend live close enough to be able to get home fairly quickly (perhaps while even humming Nick’s song ‘The Baby’s Done a Poo’) in the event of a diaper emergency. I can’t speak for the facilities at the other locations where Nick does concerts, but again, it may be that many attendees live close by and can get home for diaper changes.

Feeding: I’ve seen mothers happily breastfeeding their younger babies as their toddler joins the ranks of dancing children. And although food is not available to buy, eating in the hall is permitted and there are plenty of rice cakes, raisins, and other snacks strewn on the floor by the time the concert is over.

In total, the Nick Cope concerts at St Albans Church Hall get a 6 out of 8 on my baby- and toddler-friendliness scale, the mark lowered only because there is no baby-changing facility available at that location (not his fault, of course!). But Nick Cope himself gets a 10 out of 10 in my book. Go and see his concerts; you and your young children will love them.

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