Tag Archives: baby-changing table

It’s Oxford Mommy’s second birthday!

Two years ago I started this blog in order to help parents – including myself! – to find the most baby-friendly places in and around Oxford. I’m constantly amazed at how many people are viewing this site, and I thank every one of my readers for taking the time to look through my reviews. I hope that I’ve been helpful and encouraging, especially to those who are a little bit wary of venturing forth into town with a new baby. I still remember the trepidation I felt when the Baberoo was very small and I had no experience of being a parent. I hope, equally, that families with lots of experience with little ones are also finding these reviews helpful, no matter whether their littlest one is teeny-tiny or nearly ready for school.

I’ve been posting reviews less often this year for a reason that may be familiar to some of you: when the Baberoo consolidated all her naps into one (very long) long nap during the day, it turned out to be at lunchtime, so I could no longer go out to restaurants in the way that I had become accustomed! I decided to honour her naptime (especially since when I didn’t I was faced with a very cranky toddler indeed), so we ended up going out a lot less often than we had done the year before.

Now that we have entered the realm of no naps at all, we are planning to head out for more lunches, activities, and events in the next little while! We are also in the midst of potty-training, so the portion of my reviews that deals with baby-changing facilities will also take into account how well the facilities work when you are lugging around a potty and all the accompanying paraphernalia!

Thanks so much for being part of my readership. I am so pleased to be your guide to Oxford’s best baby- and toddler-friendly venues. If you have any comments, questions, or ideas for future reviews, please get in touch at oxfordmommy@gmail.com.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cotswold Wildlife Park and Gardens

I’ve never been much of an animal lover. Zoos and wildlife parks have never held any appeal for me; I prefer cultural and culinary adventures rather than getting up close to nature in all its glory. So I very nearly didn’t go along when the Baberoo’s Gran and Oxford Daddy planned a trip to Cotswold Wildlife Park and Gardens (near Burford, Oxfordshire, OX18 4JP; £14.50 for adults, £10 for children 3-16 and seniors, free for under-3s). And that would have been a shame – because as it turned out, it was more fun than a barrel full of monkeys.

And there sure were monkeys. Monkeys, marmosets, lemurs, tamarins, and gibbons! They were all so interesting up close – I never thought I would enjoy observing  small primates so much. The Baberoo loved the smaller animals, especially the meerkats and the squirrel monkeys. She also enjoyed seeing the penguins and tropical birds as well as the larger mammals (although I’m not quite sure she can distinguish between most of them yet: the wolves, warty pigs, and capybaras all elicited a ‘woof woof’ sound).

Cotswold Wildlife Park penguin

What struck me most about the Cotswold Wildlife Park was how nicely it was laid out and how beautiful the vegetation was – both in the animals’ habitats and in the landscaped gardens. The gardens are as finely and professionally cultivated as any botanical garden, although they prefer to refer to their style of horticulture as ‘theatre with plants’. We were lucky enough to go on a beautiful sunny day that was not too hot, but I imagine that the gardens are equally lovely in different seasons. Since nearly everything is outdoors, make sure you plan accordingly with umbrellas, stroller covers, sweaters, jackets, and/or sunscreen, depending on the weather forecast.

Cotswold Wildlife Park landscaped gardens

The Cotswold Wildlife Park is an easily walkable size, and for those who don’t want to walk the whole time there’s a narrow-gauge railway (£1, free for under-3s) that will take you around the park. (Unfortunately, you wouldn’t be able to fit a stroller onto the train, so it’s not suitable for babies or toddlers.) If you have an older toddler or child who likes crafts, you can also visit the Brass Rubbing Centre, located in the Victorian Manor House in the centre of the Park (open school holidays and summer weekends; £1-£2.50). There’s a Children’s Farmyard where young ones can pet the animals and an Adventure Playground so they can run around, and a new ‘Skymaze’ adventure playground is set to open on July 19th.

Cotswold Manor House

Judging by the number of strollers and small children, Cotswold Wildlife Park and Gardens is no secret to families around Oxfordshire. We loved it and will definitely be back. Here’s how it rates for baby- and toddler-friendliness according to my five criteria of menu, space, ambiance, facilities, and feeding.

Menu: The Oak Tree Restaurant is the main eatery at the Wildlife Park; it offers standard cafeteria-type dishes such as chilli con carne, jacket potatoes, burgers, or chicken nuggets, with chips as a side for most meals. A few of the dishes can be eaten one-handed if you are holding a baby in one arm. The restaurant offers children’s portions as well as baby-sized portions of most of the main meals. There are also three kiosks serving ice cream and snacks. But frankly, your best bet, for price as well as for ambiance, is to bring a picnic and eat in the gardens or at one of the picnic shelters or picnic tables around the park. We laid our blanket out on the Anniversary Lawn and ate a lovely picnic while we watched the train circling the park.

Space: There’s plenty of space in the Cotswold Wildlife Park and Gardens, and even double strollers – of which we saw plenty – will fit comfortably into all the entrances, paths, and facilities (although pushchairs are not allowed in the Madagascar exhibit, so you’ll have to take your little one out if you’d like to visit that one). The hard part is getting there: the Park is two miles south of Burford on the A361, about 20 miles west of Oxford. Coming by car is by far the best (some might say it’s the only) option, as buses to Burford are few and far between. The bus route from Oxford is the Swanbrook No. 853, operating three times daily on weekdays, four times on Saturdays, and once on Sunday, and you need to get a taxi from Burford to the Wildlife Park after getting off the bus. If you don’t have a car, it might be an idea to hire one for the day. Parking is excellent, with staff directing drivers to the next available space in the grass car park.

Ambiance: This is definitely a place for kids and it’s geared towards their enjoyment, from the signage to the Adventure Playground. Whoops of delight and happy faces everywhere made it clear that families were enjoying themselves, and the commercial aspects of the Park were kept very clearly within the shop and the eateries. The animals we saw looked like they were thriving and happy in their surroundings. All the staff we saw were pleasant and knowledgeable.

Facilities: There are four toilet blocks around the park, one of which is in the restaurant. All of them have baby-changing and disabled facilities. The baby-changing in the large block of toilets nearest the shop (shown at left in the picture below) is bigger than the one in the restaurant (shown at right). All of the baby-changing facilities I saw were clean and well-aired.

Cotswold Wildlife Park baby-changing facilities

Feeding: If your little one is eating solid food, you can get a child- or baby-sized meal at the restaurant. If you’re breastfeeding, there are many places to sit around the park, including picnic tables and garden benches, or just on the grass. If you’d like a secluded area for breastfeeding, you’ll be able to find one somewhere around the park.

In total the Cotswold Wildlife Park and Gardens gets an 8.25 out of 10 for baby- and toddler-friendliness. Although it’s much more geared towards school-aged kids than towards babies or toddlers, I’d highly recommend it as a great day out for even the youngest of babies. Most little ones will be thrilled to get a close-up look at the real-life counterparts of the toys they snuggle with and the animals they read about in books.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Giraffe

Giraffe is a chain known for its kid-friendliness, so it came as no surprise that on the day the Baberoo and I visited the central Oxford location (71 George Street, OX1 2BQ) there were kids or babies at almost every table. We were starving from doing so much Christmas shopping and we really needed lunch pronto, and Giraffe is one of the places that I know can be relied upon to get your order to you quickly.

Although Giraffe offers a very reasonably-priced £6.25 lunch special from Monday-Friday, I decided to go for the BBQ chicken and smoked cheddar quesadilla (£9.25) and a Coke (£2.45). The quesadilla was a very generous size and came with a salsa for dipping and a side of slaw. It didn’t press any buttons on my deliciousness barometer, but it was fine and filling and easy to eat while I was feeding the Baberoo.

Giraffe quesadilla

Although we’d brought some fruit from home it wasn’t enough for the Baberoo’s lunch, so I ordered her something from the kids’ menu. The entrees are all under £6 and there’s also a meal deal that includes a main plus a drink for £4.95, all day, any day of the week. I got the Baberoo the Italian pizza bites (£4.05), which come with a side of fries and a salad. It arrived in record time; she only did a little bit of screeching when I didn’t serve her pre-meal grapes as fast as she would have liked. The Baberoo enjoyed the pizza bites, which were made with nice fluffy focaccia bread, and had fun examining the salad leaves minutely before eating them. (Sorry, kiddo, but Mommy had to eat all your fries for you because you’re not allowed to have them yet. Ha ha ha!)

Giraffe pizza bites

Certainly Giraffe is kid-friendly and caters to a family audience. So how does it do when it comes to baby-friendliness? My ratings system (explained in full on my About page) takes into account menu, space, ambiance, facilities, and feeding.

Menu: For parents, there’s plenty on the Giraffe menu that can be eaten one-handed if you need to hold your baby in the other arm. Breakfast/brunch items, salads, pastas and some of the Giraffe ‘favourites’ all give you good choices for one-handed eating. It’s nice that they have a whole kids’ menu, too, and the portions (for both adults and children) are generous.

Space: There’s ample space to move around the restaurant with your baby carriage, although you probably wouldn’t get to park more than one carriage at a table. Go for one of the circular tables rather than the booths because you’ll have more of a choice for where to put your buggy. One annoying thing is that it’s somewhat difficult to enter the restaurant; there are two heavy glass doors and you have to turn a corner. Usually a staff member will be able to help you but it’s too bad the doors don’t open more easily. It seems like a no-brainer to provide easy access in a kid-friendly place.

Giraffe interior

Ambiance: Colourful, festive, and global. The decor in the restaurant will be pleasing to children and babies; it’s bright and fun. The staff are very helpful and friendly to children. We were offered a high chair and a kids’ menu right away. On the day we went, it looked like there were only two members of staff taking care of all the tables, but they were in very good humour and seemed to be having fun despite being run off their feet. They also give out balloons to children, which is always nice (unless your baby is scared of them – I know I was as a child!).

Giraffe wall

Facilities: The bright orange baby-changing/disabled toilet is a fine size and has a good layout, although the bin should be closer to the changing table. On the day we visited it was clean and well-aired despite not having a window. It suffers from a narrow pull-down changing table without a shelf to put your bag on, but there’s space to hang your bag from the corner of the table. If you’re waiting in the corridor for someone to come out, you may have to back up quite a long way when they leave the changing room as it’s a very narrow corridor.

Giraffe baby-changing facilities

Feeding: No one minded that we had brought some of our own food for part of the Baberoo’s lunch. I’ve also fed her entirely with home-prepared food on a different visit and it didn’t raise any eyebrows. I haven’t breastfed her at Giraffe, but the ambiance suggests that it would be welcomed, and you can choose from tables with regular seats or bench seating, whichever is more comfortable for you.

In total, Giraffe gets an 8 out of 10 for baby-friendliness. It’s a reliable place to stop in with a young one and you won’t be kept waiting long for your meal.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,