Tag Archives: changing facilities

It’s Oxford Mommy’s second birthday!

Two years ago I started this blog in order to help parents – including myself! – to find the most baby-friendly places in and around Oxford. I’m constantly amazed at how many people are viewing this site, and I thank every one of my readers for taking the time to look through my reviews. I hope that I’ve been helpful and encouraging, especially to those who are a little bit wary of venturing forth into town with a new baby. I still remember the trepidation I felt when the Baberoo was very small and I had no experience of being a parent. I hope, equally, that families with lots of experience with little ones are also finding these reviews helpful, no matter whether their littlest one is teeny-tiny or nearly ready for school.

I’ve been posting reviews less often this year for a reason that may be familiar to some of you: when the Baberoo consolidated all her naps into one (very long) long nap during the day, it turned out to be at lunchtime, so I could no longer go out to restaurants in the way that I had become accustomed! I decided to honour her naptime (especially since when I didn’t I was faced with a very cranky toddler indeed), so we ended up going out a lot less often than we had done the year before.

Now that we have entered the realm of no naps at all, we are planning to head out for more lunches, activities, and events in the next little while! We are also in the midst of potty-training, so the portion of my reviews that deals with baby-changing facilities will also take into account how well the facilities work when you are lugging around a potty and all the accompanying paraphernalia!

Thanks so much for being part of my readership. I am so pleased to be your guide to Oxford’s best baby- and toddler-friendly venues. If you have any comments, questions, or ideas for future reviews, please get in touch at oxfordmommy@gmail.com.

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Clockwork Music

I started taking the Baberoo to music and sensory sessions long ago, when she was just 7 months old. Now, aged 2 ¼, she still loves going to her regular class every week. Clockwork Music (various venues; £66 per 12-week term) is relatively new to Oxford, but is based upon the many years of music teaching experience of co-founders Claire Naylor and Karen Amos. We started out in Claire’s classes when she was teaching through the nationwide Monkey Music system, but she and Karen have now ventured out on their own to create the fabulous Clockwork Music curriculum. It’s a half-hour of fun, songs, games, and experimenting with musical instruments, with lots of movement, dancing, and just a wee bit of organized chaos going on.

Clockwork Music instruments

Clockwork Music offers sessions for different age levels from the youngest babies to pre-schoolers. Our session is the Clockmakers group, for children between 2-3 years old, and takes place on Wednesday mornings at St. Giles Church Hall. Other sessions run at different venues in and around Oxford, Abingdon, and Thame. For information about these sessions please check the Clockwork Music website for venues listings. This review will focus on the Clockmakers session with Claire at St Giles Church Hall.

Clockwork Music Tick Tock clock

As soon as you walk into the Clockwork Music classroom and see Claire with her selection of toys, puppets, musical instruments, and other props, you know that you’ll be in for a fantastic time. Tick Tock, the giant clock, has hands that turn to point to the songs that will be sung during the session, and Tick Tock’s friends Brown Bear, Mouse, Dragon, and many other friendly animals will lead you through each tune. Babies will enjoy hearing the different sounds of instruments and noisemakers, while toddlers and preschoolers will enjoy banging on drums, shaking maracas and rainmakers, and clacking castanets. There’s also time for stomping, dancing, and following along with actions to songs. The energy in the room is always positive, and Claire does an amazing job of going with the flow while also gently leading the class through the scheduled session.

Space: The main room of St Giles Church Hall acts as the music classroom. It’s a lovely open space with high ceilings, beautiful windows, good lighting, nice wooden floors, and lots of room to run around and play. There are benches where you can deposit your coats and bags. Your stroller can be parked in an adjoining space which has ample room for about 15 pushchairs or so.

Clockwork Music St Giles Church Hall

Ambiance: Fun, friendly, and energetic. Singing along to the catchy tunes will perk you up if you (or your child) are feeling low. The welcoming feeling in the room is an unbeatable combination of engaging teacher and well-chosen venue. And the little ones and parents we have met in the friendly atmosphere have ended up being some of our best friends.

Facilities: There is a baby-changing table in one of the bathrooms just off the main classroom. The bathroom is spacious, clean and well-lit, and the pull-down table works fine. The only problem is that for some reason there are no garbage bins in that or any other bathrooms in the building. If you have a stinky nappy to dispose of, you will have to bag it and take it with you until you can find an appropriate place to bin it.

Feeding: There are built-in benches in the main classroom at St Giles Church Hall. When the Baberoo was younger and still breastfeeding, I would sit on a bench after class while Claire tidied up the props and I would breastfeed her, often in the company of another mother or two. The benches are comfortable enough, but there are also some plastic chairs in the entry area and the stroller-parking area if you prefer. For older toddlers and kids who need snacks I’m fairly sure that it’s fine to eat in the room, although if there is another class coming in directly after you there may not be time to sit and stay a while while munching on a treat. However, there are several cafés nearby, to which you could hop along for, say, a babyccino, as we usually do with some of our classmates.

Clockwork Music is one of our favourite activities of the week. I can’t recommend it highly enough. This review gives it 7 out of 8 points, but it can’t do justice to the fun and camaraderie that we experience every time we go. If you are looking for a fun session that introduces your little one to music and movement, Clockwork Music is my top recommendation.

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Pierre Victoire Bistrot

I have been meaning to visit Pierre Victoire (9 Little Clarendon Street, OX1 2HP) for quite a while now, but I’ve always been worried that its cozy (read: non-spacious) interior won’t afford enough room for our massive pushchair. But this weekend as the Baberoo, her Daddy, and I strolled around Oxford looking for a good place for lunch, we decided that we would give it a shot – despite the fact that nearly all the tables were occupied. Sometimes you just really want a confit, you know?

We hadn’t been out to eat in a while because the Baberoo’s nap is usually during lunch time, and I am very pleased to report that there has been a massive change for the better in her table manners and patience. Parents of toddlers, rejoice! There is yet hope if you cringe at the thought of taking your little one out. In my experience, from age 12 months to about 20 months was the worst of the tantrum stage, and I can see that things are starting to get better. (Parents of older toddlers, are you shaking your heads thinking that I don’t know what I’m talking about and the worst is yet to come? I beseech you, don’t burst my bubble. The kid acted great this time. I know I’m basing my prediction on one instance, but I hope that this trend will continue.)

With the Baberoo ensconced in her high chair, we ordered from the Prix Fixe menu, available from Monday-Saturday from 12:00-2:30 (a terrific value at £7.90 for one course, £9.90 for two, or £11.90 for three, with a few selections that cost extra). I chose the Confit de Canard à la Framboise, the duck confit with raspberry sauce and gratin Dauphinois. I was very happy with the way the meat fell away from the bone, and the tangy sauce complemented the rich flavour of the duck. The cheesy, buttery potatoes were also delightful. My husband enjoyed his steak, and the Baberoo ate quite a lot of her Linguine à la Provençale, the pasta-and-tomato-sauce dish from the kids’ menu (£5.90 for a main plus dessert), plus two little pots of grated cheese. She also wolfed down her ice cream, which had flecks of real vanilla bean, while my husband chose a pleasingly-spiced apple cake.

Pierre Victoire confit de canard

The service couldn’t have been nicer. The maitre d’, who helped us get in with our stroller and parked it in a corner near the kitchen so that we had plenty of room around our table, was charismatic and hospitable. During his many tours of the restaurant floor we overheard him chatting with diners, taking reservations (some from people lunching who wanted to come back for dinner!) and giving advice – including recommendations on how best to get wine stains out of clothing. I think the yellow cardigan in question was actually taken to the kitchen and the wine stains removed! When he came to our table he told us about his little boy, whose favourite food is snails (for the record, right now the Baberoo’s favourite is olives). Our waiting staff were also very helpful and, for the most part, efficient, especially considering that the restaurant remained full far past the lunch closing time of 2:30.

I truly enjoyed my meal and the whole experience I had at Pierre Victoire. I will certainly be going back again to try some of the other menu offerings. But how does it rate for baby- and toddler-friendliness? The five categories I look at are menu, space, ambiance, facilities, and feeding – you can find out more about these on my About page.

Menu: Classic French dishes usually require the use of both hands to eat, so if you’re looking for something you can eat one-handed while holding a baby in the other arm, you only have a small number of choices when it comes to main courses. The hors d’oeuvres are mosty doable, but for mains the only ones that you could eat with one hand for sure are the quiche and the risotto – although I think I could have eaten my duck with one hand in a pinch.

Space: True to the cozy bistrot style, the tables at Pierre Victoire are packed close together and there’s not a lot of room to move around, especially with a stroller. That said, our maitre d’ was excellent at helping us into and through the restaurant and relieving us of the pushchair to save space at the table.

Pierre Victoire restaurant interior

Ambiance: The staff were friendly and spoke directly to the Baberoo. Music, if there was any, was drowned out by the boisterous sounds of happy diners – not a bad thing, unless you have a sleeping little one who is prone to awakening at loud laughter. The decor is homey and unpretentious.

Facilities: Quel dommage! Pierre Victoire doesn’t have any baby-changing facilities. It’s such a shame, because there is probably enough room in the toilets to add one if they could re-jig the space a bit (although you would still have to go downstairs to the basement). There is a wooden counter where the sink is, but it would only accommodate the smallest of infants. If your little one is any bigger, you’re out of luck unless you want to try the floor.

Pierre Victoire toilets

Feeding: Because the tables are quite close together, if you’re breastfeeding you might be a little cramped. The wooden chairs are not especially comfortable, but they’ll do if you need to breastfeed. For little ones who are eating solid food, there are high chairs and a kids’ menu, although some offerings (smoked salmon quiche, chicken and fries) are more suited to older kids’ palates. If your toddler enjoys pasta (and really, who knows one who doesn’t?) the linguine with tomato sauce will do fine.

In total, Pierre Victoire gets a 6.5 out of 10 for baby- and toddler-friendliness. The mark is necessarily lower because of the lack of baby-changing facilities, but it’s no reflection on the food, which I thought was excellent. I would say that it’s more of a place for parents to enjoy on their own, rather than with their little ones, but if you are fine with no changing facilities then by all means go with your babies and toddlers. The staff will help you out and you can all enjoy the French fare together. Personally, I can’t wait to come back here on a date alone with my chéri so we can enjoy a whole leisurely 3-course dinner.

 

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Aqua Babies at Temple Cowley Pool

(Updated August 2015: Temple Cowley Pool has now closed. All operations have been transferred to Leys Pools and Leisure Centre.)

I am not a born swimmer. I hate getting my face wet. I hate being under water. And even though I managed to make it through years of swimming classes as a child and finally ended up being a pretty good swimmer, I still have a primal fear of being submerged. I want my kid to feel better about being in the water than I did when I was young, so I started her early with Aqua Babies, a swimming programme for little ones from 4 to 18 months old at Temple Cowley Pool (Temple Road, OX4 2EZ)

Temple Cowley Pool sign

Aqua Babies (£5.50 per session) runs four times a week (Monday 10:15, Tuesday 11:15, Friday 11:15 and 14:00) and is bookable by phone on 01865 467124 or online. The 45-minute class includes both serious learning and fun time: the first part teaches babies essential skills such as going under water, finding the side of the pool and holding on, and kicking on both the stomach and the back. Then there are songs, splashing about, and time to play with toys. It’s a great way to get your baby used to the water, and the teachers (Carol and Brenda) are both excellent with little ones.

One of the best things about Aqua Babies is that you don’t have to sign up for a whole course. You just book an individual session each time, so you can choose different days of the week or skip some weeks or even call in to cancel a session if your baby happens to be taking an extra-long nap and you don’t want to wake them up. Compared to baby swimming lessons elsewhere, this is fantastic (I have friends in different cities who are literally hovering over their computers hitting the refresh button on the morning that swimming class bookings open). The freedom of choice is great, but do make sure that you book in advance because the classes sometimes are fully booked and they take a maximum of 12 babies.

Here’s how Aqua Babies at Temple Cowley Pool rates for baby-friendliness, based on my 8-point rating scale for activities. In my reviews I look at space, ambiance, facilities, and feeding; see my About page for more information on my ratings system.

Space: Before you enter the changing rooms, you’ll have to park your baby carriage in the designated space under the stairs in the lobby. There are usually several carriages under there, although I have seen parents take them into the changing rooms as well (there is a small fenced-off area in the changing room where you can put a lightweight foldable umbrella-type stroller, but nothing bigger). The changing rooms at Temple Cowley Pool have quite a lot of space and you will always find an area where you can spread out your swimming paraphernalia. However, the lockers (for which you need a pound coin) must be the worst lockers in the history of fitness facilities; usually I have to try three before I get one with a working key, which is hard to do while holding a baby and about five bags of necessities. They are clean, though, as is the rest of the changing room. There are two areas with a baby-changing table in each of them and a further four cubbyhole-type private changing rooms. Certainly, there is lots of space for you to navigate the seemingly-impossible task of getting a baby’s swimming costume on and off. There is also a Family changing room for parents who come together with their baby.

Temple Cowley Pool women's changing room

Ambiance: The learning pool is a very welcoming space and the teachers are lovely. Other parents are friendly. It feels like a fun place to be, an ambiance which other pools I’ve been to definitely lack. Everything revolves around the babies during a session, so it is very baby-friendly.

Facilities: There are two areas in the women’s changing room with baby-changing tables. They’re in high demand after an Aqua Babies session, so be prepared to wait for one if you need to use it. There’s also a regular pull-down baby-changing table in the regular women’s toilets, but you wouldn’t use it for changing into or out of a swimming costume.

Temple Cowley Pool baby-changing facilities

Feeding: I’ve seen mothers breastfeed their babies right in the changing room, and there’s also a space in the lobby with tables that are sometimes full of mothers breastfeeding or bottle-feeding their babies after a session. It has a very welcoming community-type feel to it. The benches in the changing room might be more comfortable than the non-adjustable bucket-seat chairs at the lobby tables, though.

Temple Cowley Pool tables in lobby

In total, Aquababies at Temple Cowley Pool rates a 6.75 out of 8. If you are looking for a way to get your little one used to the water at a very young age, I highly recommend it. And it is so much fun to watch your baby splash about in the pool!

I’d like to end this post with a shout-out to the Save Temple Cowley Pools & Fitness Centre campaign. Temple Cowley Pools (and the fitness centre, and Blackbird Leys pool as well) are currently under threat of closure by Oxford City Council. If you’d like to know more and sign the petition to keep it open, please visit the Save Temple Cowley Pools & Fitness Centre website and follow them on Twitter at @SaveTCP.  The pool is such an important resource for Cowley and surrounding areas that it would be a shame if it were to close.

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