Tag Archives: dancing

Clockwork Music

I started taking the Baberoo to music and sensory sessions long ago, when she was just 7 months old. Now, aged 2 ¼, she still loves going to her regular class every week. Clockwork Music (various venues; £66 per 12-week term) is relatively new to Oxford, but is based upon the many years of music teaching experience of co-founders Claire Naylor and Karen Amos. We started out in Claire’s classes when she was teaching through the nationwide Monkey Music system, but she and Karen have now ventured out on their own to create the fabulous Clockwork Music curriculum. It’s a half-hour of fun, songs, games, and experimenting with musical instruments, with lots of movement, dancing, and just a wee bit of organized chaos going on.

Clockwork Music instruments

Clockwork Music offers sessions for different age levels from the youngest babies to pre-schoolers. Our session is the Clockmakers group, for children between 2-3 years old, and takes place on Wednesday mornings at St. Giles Church Hall. Other sessions run at different venues in and around Oxford, Abingdon, and Thame. For information about these sessions please check the Clockwork Music website for venues listings. This review will focus on the Clockmakers session with Claire at St Giles Church Hall.

Clockwork Music Tick Tock clock

As soon as you walk into the Clockwork Music classroom and see Claire with her selection of toys, puppets, musical instruments, and other props, you know that you’ll be in for a fantastic time. Tick Tock, the giant clock, has hands that turn to point to the songs that will be sung during the session, and Tick Tock’s friends Brown Bear, Mouse, Dragon, and many other friendly animals will lead you through each tune. Babies will enjoy hearing the different sounds of instruments and noisemakers, while toddlers and preschoolers will enjoy banging on drums, shaking maracas and rainmakers, and clacking castanets. There’s also time for stomping, dancing, and following along with actions to songs. The energy in the room is always positive, and Claire does an amazing job of going with the flow while also gently leading the class through the scheduled session.

Space: The main room of St Giles Church Hall acts as the music classroom. It’s a lovely open space with high ceilings, beautiful windows, good lighting, nice wooden floors, and lots of room to run around and play. There are benches where you can deposit your coats and bags. Your stroller can be parked in an adjoining space which has ample room for about 15 pushchairs or so.

Clockwork Music St Giles Church Hall

Ambiance: Fun, friendly, and energetic. Singing along to the catchy tunes will perk you up if you (or your child) are feeling low. The welcoming feeling in the room is an unbeatable combination of engaging teacher and well-chosen venue. And the little ones and parents we have met in the friendly atmosphere have ended up being some of our best friends.

Facilities: There is a baby-changing table in one of the bathrooms just off the main classroom. The bathroom is spacious, clean and well-lit, and the pull-down table works fine. The only problem is that for some reason there are no garbage bins in that or any other bathrooms in the building. If you have a stinky nappy to dispose of, you will have to bag it and take it with you until you can find an appropriate place to bin it.

Feeding: There are built-in benches in the main classroom at St Giles Church Hall. When the Baberoo was younger and still breastfeeding, I would sit on a bench after class while Claire tidied up the props and I would breastfeed her, often in the company of another mother or two. The benches are comfortable enough, but there are also some plastic chairs in the entry area and the stroller-parking area if you prefer. For older toddlers and kids who need snacks I’m fairly sure that it’s fine to eat in the room, although if there is another class coming in directly after you there may not be time to sit and stay a while while munching on a treat. However, there are several cafés nearby, to which you could hop along for, say, a babyccino, as we usually do with some of our classmates.

Clockwork Music is one of our favourite activities of the week. I can’t recommend it highly enough. This review gives it 7 out of 8 points, but it can’t do justice to the fun and camaraderie that we experience every time we go. If you are looking for a fun session that introduces your little one to music and movement, Clockwork Music is my top recommendation.

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Nick Cope

The Baberoo has owned one of the CDs by Nick Cope, the Oxford-based children’s singer-songwriter, for quite a while now, and we have always enjoyed listening to his music. But we had never been to see one of his concerts (£3 per child, £1 per adult) until last month. We accompanied some friends who are regular attendees to a performance at the St Albans Church Hall in East Oxford (corner of Charles and Catherine Streets), and as soon as he started playing I kicked myself for not attending a live show before.

There’s a reason Nick Cope has such a strong following. He is beloved by both children and parents because his songs are delightful and catchy. We’ve all had the irritating ‘Wheels on the Bus’ earworm follow us around for days at a time, but Nick Cope’s songs are so funny and tuneful that it’s actually a pleasure to catch yourself humming, oh, say, a song about a witch that lived in a forest with a pet dragon named Keith.

It’s his unusual and inventive songwriting that’ll charm you first, and if you’ve got his CDs (he’s got three so far and a fourth to be released for Christmas 2014) then it’s fun to sing along to his indie-pop-sounding songs with your little one at home. But when you see him performing live, you’ll realize what you’ve been missing. It is brilliant live entertainment. He’s got an incredible talent for relating to both children and adults at the same time. He gets the audience clapping, stomping, making faces, and jumping up and down with gusto. His act is a perfect balance of over-the-top gurning and deadpan patter. And his impressions are spot-on; when he does one of his animal songs you actually believe that what you are seeing in front of you is a meerkat.

Nick Cope plays weekly family music sessions at several locations in Oxford and Abingdon, and also performs at festivals and events in and around Oxfordshire. The session we have attended most frequently runs from 10:45-11:45 on Fridays at St Albans Church Hall in East Oxford (although it’s a bit of a trek for us; I wish there was a concert location in Headington!). We’ve also been to see him in Wantage at the Beacon, and he’s a regular at the Story Museum during school holidays. Check Nick’s site for details of locations and times for upcoming sessions. The following details about space, ambiance, facilities, and feeding (as per my usual ratings system) refer specifically to the St Albans Church Hall location.

Space: The space at St Albans Church Hall isn’t huge, but it’s got enough room for about 30-40 families, including enough space for everyone’s baby carriage to be parked at the back. A half-circle of about 30 chairs provides a seating space, and there’s plenty more space to sit on the floor. Many children love to go right up to the front to watch Nick play, all the better to watch his hilarious facial expressions.

Ambiance: The feeling when you walk into a Nick Cope concert couldn’t be more wonderful. The music puts you in such a good mood that you feel like you’re friends with everyone in the room. To watch the gyrating toddlers throwing themselves around in gleeful abandon takes you back to your own childhood, lifting your spirits and temporarily banishing all your worries. There’s a reason I’ve never seen a kid cry at a Nick Cope concert (unless they’ve fallen and bonked themselves, in which case the crying only lasts a couple of seconds). It’s like magic. Yes, it’s that good.

Facilities: St Albans Church Hall, unfortunately, does not have any baby-changing facilities. However, there would be ample space on the floor (not in the bathroom itself, but in the concert area) if you needed to change a diaper. But I’m guessing most people who attend live close enough to be able to get home fairly quickly (perhaps while even humming Nick’s song ‘The Baby’s Done a Poo’) in the event of a diaper emergency. I can’t speak for the facilities at the other locations where Nick does concerts, but again, it may be that many attendees live close by and can get home for diaper changes.

Feeding: I’ve seen mothers happily breastfeeding their younger babies as their toddler joins the ranks of dancing children. And although food is not available to buy, eating in the hall is permitted and there are plenty of rice cakes, raisins, and other snacks strewn on the floor by the time the concert is over.

In total, the Nick Cope concerts at St Albans Church Hall get a 6 out of 8 on my baby- and toddler-friendliness scale, the mark lowered only because there is no baby-changing facility available at that location (not his fault, of course!). But Nick Cope himself gets a 10 out of 10 in my book. Go and see his concerts; you and your young children will love them.

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